Nov 13 2015 12999 1

Nov 13 2015 12999 1

TIPS ON KEEPING YOUR HOME SAFE FROM A HOME INVASION


With the recent rash of home invasions going on, we wanted to share some tips on how to keep your home safe and secure.


Protect And Fortify

So how do you fortify your home to become a hard target and take steps to protect yourself? Education and planning are key, so use these steps below and get started!

Home Exterior

  • Keep your house well lit at night to discourage would-be criminals. Have motion detecting flood lights on low-lit areas around your home.

  • Post stickers and alarm signs on the exterior of your home. Even fake alarm decals and signs can be a deterrent.

  • Don’t leave heavy objects in the backyard that can be used to throw through windows, particularly patio furniture.

  • Invest in security cameras with motion sensors, IR and a solid recording device like a DVR. The cost on these has come down considerably from what they used to be.

  • Make sure your camera recording system is housed in a lockbox so a thief can’t take the recording of their crime.

  • Redundant camera angles can help capture footage of a criminal that has properly cased your house and knows the path they can take to disable a camera before it sees them.

  • Internet cameras can also be a good option if you’re away from your home and still need to monitor them.

  • At the least, have a zone alarm to alert you when someone is coming to the door or up the driveway.

  • Use highly-visible house numbers so that the Police can readily identify your home.

  • Lock your gates using an Abloy Security Padlock and leave some nice surprises on top of the fence if they think about scaling it.

  • Don’t enter your home if it looks like it’s been illegally entered, leave the premises and call the police.

  • Be aware of the trash you leave on the curb. Break down boxes from recently purchased items like TVs and conceal them from prying eyes and the trash man.

Windows

  • Always lock windows, even second floor windows.

  • Use secondary locking devices on windows to prevent them from opening past a certain height. Just one more thing to make it more difficult to gain entry.

  • Ensure windows have vibration or glass-break sensors connected to the alarm system.

  • Consider Solar Screens on your windows which will not only save on your cooling bill, but allow you more privacy and prevent window shopping.

  • Solar Screens also are typically screwed into your window frame, which makes removing them slightly more difficult.

  • Look at anti-break window film as an option. If you have glass doors, make sure they’re double paned and laminated.

  • Fortify basement windows with bars or anti-break window film. Secure windows where A/C units are attached.

  • Put a dowel rod in the track of your sliding glass door to prevent it from being opened if the lock is bypassed.

  • Secure any skylights or roof-access with upgraded hardware or anti-break window film.

  • Be aware of the bushes surrounding exterior windows. Sharp hedges (along with the noise created) will discourage these as entry points.

  • Trim your exterior bushes to prevent hiding places and trim tree limbs that allow second story or roof access.

Doors

  • Use solid-core exterior doors including the door into your garage, which should also have a deadbolt.

  • Get a wide-angle peephole and use it before answering the door, but consider covering it up while not in useReverse peephole viewers are readily available.

  • Invest in anti-kick door solutions like a Door Devil to prevent brute force entry. A door chain isn’t going to help one bit, even answering the door.

  • Upgrade your locks to high security locks. Bump-Proof locks, Medeco locks and others like these are worth the investment. Most household locks are simple to bypass.

  • At the very least you should install longer screws into your door jambs and hinges, preferably 3″ screws.

  • Have a spare key hidden in an uncommon place outside your home or better yet, with a neighbor.

Home Interior

  • Get a security alarm with interior motion detectors and set the alarm when you’re at home (obviously not the interior motion detector). Criminals rely on an alarm not being set while someone is home and awake.

  • Insure your alarm is monitored and will continue to work in the event you lose power in a storm or it happens to be neutralized. Look into cellular monitoring.

  • Have a secondary alarm keypad in your master bedroom that can be used to sound a panic alarm or quickly access alarm controls.

  • Have a plan for your family or roommates in your home in the event of a home invasion. Talk it over and know what each person’s responsibilities are. That plan should include ways to escape the home if necessary.

  • Consider a safe room as a rally point where you have the ability to protect yourself and call the police. Stash a spare cell phone here.

  • Keep your cell phone by the bed ready for you or another person to call 911.

  • Keep multiple weapons in places that you’ll likely be taken to in an invasion. Obviously you need to be aware of leaving weapons where children can get to them.

  • Have a loaded gun mounted inside the door to your safe. If you’re forced to open it, you’ll be able to give that criminal more than your valuables.

  • Get a dog. A barking dog will bring unwanted attention to a potential burglar, but don’t rely on your dog to attack a criminal unless trained to.

  • Change alarm codes often and when you have to distribute a spare key, make it to a specific (differently keyed) door in case a key is lost you’ll just have to replace one lock.

  • Record serial numbers of expensive items and have backups of your computer off-site using Mozy, Carbonite or in the cloud somehow.

  • Mark and engrave your property with your driver’s license number (not social) to aid in returning your stolen property or discourage theft in the first place.

  • Discuss the importance of home security with everyone, it only takes one person to forget to lock a door or window.

  • Bolt down safes, filing cabinets and lock up expensive items like bikes and four-wheelers.

  • Shred all personal documents using a cross-cut shredder. This includes credit card offers, envelopes with the name of your bank, etc.

Vehicles/Garage

  • Keep a weapon and tools to defeat restraints concealed in your vehicle. You could be kidnapped and forced to withdraw money from an ATM.

  • Keep spare vehicle keys or any important spares in a lock box or safe, not within reach of anyone that might gain access.

  • Always keep the alarm set on your vehicle, even in the garage. Consider a Club or secondary device to prevent theft, even in your garage.

  • Having your the keys next to you while you sleep, you can press the car alarm panic button in a pinch.

  • Consider disabling the release-cord to your electric garage door opener, particularly if you have garage door windows. If this function is needed you can have something nearby to use.

  • Change your factory set garage door opener code, thieves can drive neighborhoods with common openers looking for a doors that they work on.

Skill-Sets

  • Learn skill-sets like lock picking and defeating illegal restraints. If the criminal does get the jump on you, have the means to escape when the time is right.

  • Buy a gun and seek proper training on how to use it. Become proficient and know it’s limitations.

  • Get a concealed carry permit if allowed in your state. Always carry!

  • Don’t open carry if allowed. Why show all your cards if you have the option of concealed carry?

  • Use PERSEC (personal security) when discussing anything outside of your circle of trust, don’t reveal personal details to anyone who doesn’t need to know. That includes over the Internet and Facebook!

  • Letting people know when you’re away from home over Twitter and Facebook is just plain stupid.

  • Log all property into a trusted system with serial numbers, photos and even video that is stored off-site.


Ashley Oakes-Lazosky Headshot
Author:
Phone: 702-281-1198
Dated: November 13th 2015
Views: 134
About Ashley: I am a licensed real estate broker and I own and operate my own real estate company, called Vegas Ho...

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